Dyestuff

September 19, 2010

I have recently dyed more aerocotton for slotting using Procion MX reactive dye, the previous stocks from my initial experimentation with dye recipes having now run low.  The pipette filler I mentioned in the original dye post has been of great benefit for measuring out the very small and precise quantities of stock solution required for accuracy in the dye recipes.  There are many on the market with huge variation in sophistication and price, but the simple one I’ve been using seems fine.  The wheel mechanism allows very accurate measurement and it is easy and quick to empty.  Although we ordered our filler from Fisher Scientific you can see an image at the following link: http://www.interlab.com.tr/product.asp?cat=0&grup=19

I’ve also experimented with an easier way to dissolve the Glaubers salt (sodium sulfate) in the dye bath.  As it is anhydrous it has a tendency to clump together when added too rapidly to the solution and the resulting rock like particles are very difficult to dissolve.  It is essential to have the salt fully dissolved to prevent the resulting dyed fabric from being uneven, or unlevel, in colour.  Previously I have gradually scattered the salt over the surface in small quantities, vigorously agitating the bath throughout.  This time I tried to pre-dissolve the  salt in a moderate amount of cold water from the total quantity of water used in the dyeing process.  Using water from the overall quantity required is important as the success of the dyeing is regulated by the amount of water to weight of textile ratio and adding additional water would alter the end colour.  However, it was not possible to dissolve the quantity of salt necessary without using a larger quantity of water than the 50mls I took out of the dye bath, and any more would prevent the first stage of the dye process from effectively taking place, that is the wetting out of the textile in the dissolved dye.  Heating the solution is probably the answer – I’ll try this and let you know if this has any effect, good or bad!

Victoria

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